Page 50 - Latest Books, Top Book Authors and Popular Books in India | Hindustan Times
close_game
close_game
[

Books

]
PAGE 50

HT reviewers pick their best reads of 2021

Updated on Dec 17, 2021 03:46 PM IST

HT reviewers have been reading everything from ecopoetry to fantasy, Urdu travelogues, fiction on the lingering shadow of the Bosnian war, and tributes to DH Lawrence. This collective reading list is both eclectic and inspiring. Click on the link under each picture to learn about that reviewer’s favourite read of the year

Any place is a great place to read: A woman in her shop in New Delhi. (CHANDAN KHANNA/AFP via Getty Images)
ByHT Team

HT reviewer Kunal Ray picks his favourite reads of 2021

Living, writing, death and loss: A son watches his father slip away while the world grieves the loss of a favourite writer

Rodrigo Garcia’s heartwarming account of the last days of his parents, Gabriel Garcia Marquez and Mercedes Barcha. (HT Team)
Updated on Dec 17, 2021 02:56 PM IST
ByKunal Ray

HT reviewer Thangkhanlal Ngaihte picks his favourite reads of 2021

On the dreaded past and the precarious present: Fascism, democracy, India’s relationship with its northeastern states and local memoirs

Sanjib Baruah believes India’s northeast needs a politics of citizenship based on a vision of a common future. (HT Team)
Published on Dec 17, 2021 02:41 PM IST
ByThangkhalal Ngaihte

HT reviewer Percy Bharucha picks his favourite reads of 2021

Weaving between satire and surrealism: A novel that evokes a childish sense of joy in exploring the uncertain

KP Purnachandra Tejaswi’s Carvalho brings out the absurdity of the educated Indian’s relationship with rural life. (HT Team)
Updated on Dec 17, 2021 02:44 PM IST
ByPercy Bharucha

HT reviewer Lamat R Hasan picks her favourite reads of 2021

Saleem Kidwai’s translations of Qurratulain Hyder’s novels bring out the author’s command over the Urdu idiom

Qurratulain Hyder’s last novel, Chandni Begum, almost predicted an increasingly intolerant India. (HT Team)
Updated on Dec 17, 2021 02:37 PM IST
ByLamat R Hasan

HT reviewer Suhit Kelkar picks his favourite read of 2021

Running through every coppice: Pascale Petit’s ecopoetry opens up the reader to remorse, compassion, hope, and perhaps Nature within us

Petit twines ecological themes with her family’s Indian heritage and harmful relationships. (HT Team)
Updated on Dec 17, 2021 02:31 PM IST
BySuhit Kelkar

HT reviewer Farzana Versey picks her favourite read of 2021

About words, said and unsaid: Of storytelling that takes the reader to the heart of characters, to their acceptance or denial of identity, and to their exploitation and predation.

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s Half of a Yellow Sun is a palpable, even tactile, experience. (HT Team)
Updated on Dec 17, 2021 03:50 PM IST
ByFarzana Versey

HT reviewer KX Ronnie picks his favourite reads of 2021

The comfort of worlds unfamiliar: Dragons, mermaids, goblins and gods and reflections on class and desire in 1780s London

Fantasy novels act as a soothing balm in trying times. (HT Team)
Updated on Dec 17, 2021 02:21 PM IST
ByKX Ronnie

HT reviewer Huzan Tata picks her favourite reads of 2020

Historical women in the spotlight: The last queen of the Sikh empire and a feminist take on an Indian epic

The Last Queen follows the life of Rani Jindan, the youngest wife of Maharaja Ranjit Singh of the Sikh Empire, and mother of Duleep Singh. (HT Team)
Updated on Dec 17, 2021 01:28 PM IST
ByHuzan Tata

HT reviewer Syed Saad Ahmed picks his favourite reads of 2021

Obsessively reading travelogues and books on natural history as a consequence of being homebound and attempting to grasp the Earth’s obtusely vast timescale

The Pakistani poet Ibn-e-Insha’s witty description of his travels across Southeast Asia and West Asia. (HT Team)
Updated on Dec 17, 2021 01:23 PM IST
BySyed Saad Ahmed

HT reviewer Mahmood Farooqui picks his favourite read of 2021

The give and take that created Indo-Muslim culture; how the verses of Rumi and Sadi found a new avatar as dohas in India’s Persianate Age

Refamiliarizing the Indian reader with such well known poets as Tulsi, Kabir and Jayasi through an entirely new lens. (HT Team)
Updated on Dec 17, 2021 01:17 PM IST
ByMahmood Farooqui

HT reviewer Sonali Mujumdar picks her favourite reads of 2021

Rediscovering an old gem; A short epistolary novel written in 1912 features the coming-of-age tale of an orphan. The author Jean Webster, who also happened to be Mark Twain’s grand-niece, wrote more than half a dozen novels before she died at 40

A classic Young Adult novel. (HT Team)
Updated on Dec 17, 2021 12:56 PM IST
BySonali Mujumdar

HT reviewer Simar Bhasin picks her favourite reads of 2021

Where the future became an ending; an exposition of a world order that posits itself as a liberal force while sticking to hierarchies

Olivia Sudjic’s Asylum Road is a depiction of how trauma informs the lives of young witnesses of the Bosnian War. (HT Team)
Updated on Dec 17, 2021 12:48 PM IST
BySimar Bhasin

HT reviewer Chintan Girish Modi picks his favourite reads of 2021

Doing their best to survive; Sonal Kohli’s short stories are snapshots of lives that are made and unmade by marriage, war, miscarriage, widowhood, genocide, disability, and economic misfortunes

Short stories that pay attention to the details that go unnoticed in busy urban lives. (HT Team)
Updated on Dec 17, 2021 12:49 PM IST
ByChintan Girish Modi

HT reviewer Nawaid Anjum picks his favourite reads of 2021

A dialogue across time with Lady Chatterley: Canadian-British author Alison MacLeod’s book fuses fact and fiction in a joyous celebration of DH Lawrence’s most controversial novel

Fusing fact and fiction, Alison MacLeod’s book is a celebration of DH Lawrence’s Lady Chatterley’s Lover. (HT Team)
Updated on Dec 17, 2021 12:36 PM IST
ByNawaid Anjum

Lilly Singh introduces her book club that celebrates South Asian stories

Priyanka Chopra can't keep calm as Indo-Canadian sensation Lilly Singh now has her own book club ‘Lilly's Library’ that promises ‘juicy gup shup’ with ‘some literary drama’ and we too can't wait for its first book announcement

Lilly Singh introduces her book club that celebrates South Asian stories(Instagram/lillyslibrary)
Updated on Dec 10, 2021 07:57 PM IST
ByZarafshan Shiraz, Delhi

HT Picks; New Reads

This week’s list of interesting reads includes a journalistic memoir of the 1971 Bangladesh Liberation War by the first reporter to cover it, a book on Aligarh Muslim University and its role in the making of the modern Indian Muslim, and a narrative of how lives are lived in the villages of Bihar

A journalistic memoir of the 1971 Bangladesh Liberation War by the first reporter to cover it, a book on Aligarh Muslim University and the making of the modern Indian Muslim, and how lives are lived in the villages of Bihar -- all that on the reading list this week! (HT Team)
Published on Dec 10, 2021 04:08 PM IST
ByHT Team

Interview: Kanya D’Almeida, winner of the Commonwealth Short Story Prize 2021 - “I ask my characters endless questions”

The Sri Lankan author and journalist says she is determined not to grow cynical and that this attitude carries over to the creation of her own characters whose motivations she tries hard to understand

Author Kanya D’Almeida (Malaka MP Photography)
Published on Dec 10, 2021 04:06 PM IST
ByKX Ronnie

Review: The House Next To The Factory by Sonal Kohli

Set largely in Delhi between 1980 and 2010, Sonal Kohli’s short stories are loosely linked by a family that lives next to a factory, and follow the lives of its members, their domestic help, tuition teachers, cousins, and lovers

An unfettered view of middle class India: At a vintage car show in New Delhi. (Burhaan Kinu/Hindustan Times via Getty Images)
Updated on Dec 10, 2021 04:22 PM IST
ByPercy Bharucha

Review: Irrawaddy Imperatives by Jaideep Chanda

An attempt to address existing blind spots over Myanmar evident in policy, research and academic institutions across India

A Buddhist temple in Myanmar on the Irrawaddy river. (Shutterstock)
Updated on Dec 10, 2021 04:03 PM IST
ByShrabana Barua

Review: India’s First Dictatorship; The Emergency, 1975-77 by Christophe Jaffrelot and Pratinav Anil

The first major academic work that sheds light on the similarities between the excesses of the incumbent Hindu Right regime and Indira Gandhi’s Emergency, this is the most comprehensive analysis of what led to the event, what happened during that dark time, and how it looks compared to the period leading to the present

Jayaprakash Narayan addressing a rally on 25 June 1975 at Ramlila Ground in New Delhi just before Emergency was declared. (HT Photo)
Updated on Dec 09, 2021 06:33 PM IST
ByShaikh Mujibur Rehman

‘Shouldn’t have been on bench that heard harassment charge’: Gogoi

A controversy had erupted after justice Gogoi presided over a three-judge bench on April 20, 2019 after the accusations of sexual harassment surfaced against him.

Former Chief Justice of India Ranjan Gogoi (PTI)
Published on Dec 09, 2021 01:37 AM IST
By, Hindustan Times, New Delhi

HT Picks; New Reads

On the reading list this week is a book that looks at what data tells us about the lives, beliefs and attitudes of contemporary Indians, another that presents how water-related extremes will shape our future, and a volume that celebrates India’s tradition of handcrafted textiles

A book that looks at what data reveals about the lives, beliefs and attitudes of contemporary Indians, one on the water-related extremes that will shape the nation’s future, and a volume that is a celebration of India’s handcrafted textiles (HT Team)
Updated on Dec 03, 2021 05:44 PM IST
ByHT Team

Interview: M Mukundan, author, Delhi, A Soliloquy – “I always dream in Malayalam”

Winner of this year’s JCB Prize for Literature, M Mukundan talks about wandering the streets of Delhi, the power of translation, and contemporary Malayalam literature

Author M Mukundan (Courtesy JCB Prize)
Published on Dec 03, 2021 05:42 PM IST
ByKunal Ray

Review: Nagme, Kisse, Baatein, Yaadein – The life and lyrics of Anand Bakshi by Rakesh Anand Bakshi

An accomplished biography, grounded in the reality that film songs deliver an emotional and textural surplus that stays much longer than their cinematic experience

Hindi film lyricist Anand Bakshi in a picture dated 31 October, 1971. (KK Chawla/HT Archive)
Published on Dec 03, 2021 05:34 PM IST
BySudhirendar Sharma

Review: Christianity and Politics in Tribal India; Baptist Missionaries and Naga Nationalism by G Kanato Chophy

G Kanato Chophy disputes the conventional understanding that missionaries who came to India’s northeast highlands worked in tandem with the colonial powers to convert gullible tribal people with an exotic belief-system and the white man’s halo. The truth was far more complicated with the relationship between the American Baptist missionaries and the British administrators being more confrontational than cordial

A Naga man in traditional dress. (Shutterstock)
Published on Dec 03, 2021 05:32 PM IST
ByThangkhanlal Ngaihte

Review: Bombay Hangovers by Rochelle Potkar

Poet Rochelle Potkar’s first collection of short fiction includes 15 stories set in Mumbai and one set in Goa. They uncover the inner lives of characters while revealing the author’s knack for fashioning intricate plots and dissecting complex relationships

The teeming millions of Maximum City: A street in Mumbai during the festive season. (Kunal Patil/HT Photo)
Updated on Dec 02, 2021 03:23 PM IST
ByLamat R Hasan

Dinyar Patel wins Kamaladevi Chattopadhyay NIF Book Prize for 2021

The prestigious prize worth ₹15 lakh was awarded for Dinyar Patel’s biography of Dadabhai Naoroji, ‘Naoroji: Pioneer of Indian Nationalism’, the first comprehensive study of the most significant Indian nationalist leader before Gandhi

Author Dinyar Patel (Courtesy the Kamaladevi Chattopadhyay NIF Book Prize)
Updated on Dec 01, 2021 02:07 PM IST
ByHT Team

HT Picks; New Reads

This week’s list of interesting reads includes a book that looks at the names of many streets and localities in Delhi while attempting to decode what the act of naming and renaming means, a volume on how India helped Bangladesh freedom fighters liberate their country, and an anthology of short stories by women writers from India and across the world

This week’s reading list includes a book that looks at the names of many streets and localities in Delhi while attempting to decode what the act of naming and renaming means, a volume on how India helped Bangladesh freedom fighters liberate their country, and an anthology of short stories by women writers from India and across the world. (HT Team)
Updated on Nov 26, 2021 04:23 PM IST
ByHT Team

Heading: Interview, Shrayana Bhattacharya, author, Desperately Seeking Shah Rukh – “I’m a loud and proud feminist economist”

Economist Shrayana Bhattacharya believes that in a deeply unequal country, filmy fandom bridges class divisions and narrow identities. Bollywood star Shah Rukh Khan, especially, allows people from vastly different backgrounds to talk to each other as equals. Her book uses Shah Rukh fandom to explore the struggles of Indian women as they work, worship and wed

Author Shrayana Bhattacharya (Courtesy the publisher)
Updated on Nov 27, 2021 01:11 PM IST
ByKX Ronnie
SHARE
Story Saved
Live Score
Saved Articles
Following
My Reads
Sign out
New Delhi 0C
Thursday, July 25, 2024
Start 14 Days Free Trial Subscribe Now
Follow Us On