Different ways Muslims across the world celebrate Ramadan | Hindustan Times
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Different ways Muslims across the world celebrate Ramadan

Published on Mar 17, 2023 10:09 AM IST
  • Ramadan is a time for spiritual reflection, self-discipline, and renewal. Here are just a few examples of how Muslims around the world celebrate the festival.
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Ramadan is the ninth month of the Islamic calendar, and it is considered the holiest month for Muslims. During this month, Muslims around the world observe a month-long fast from dawn until dusk, abstaining from food, drink, and other physical needs. However, the way Muslims celebrate Ramadan may vary depending on the region and culture. Here are some of the ways Muslims around the world celebrate Ramadan: ((AP Photo/Emrah Gurel)) expand-icon View Photos in a new improved layout
Published on Mar 17, 2023 10:09 AM IST

Ramadan is the ninth month of the Islamic calendar, and it is considered the holiest month for Muslims. During this month, Muslims around the world observe a month-long fast from dawn until dusk, abstaining from food, drink, and other physical needs. However, the way Muslims celebrate Ramadan may vary depending on the region and culture. Here are some of the ways Muslims around the world celebrate Ramadan: ((AP Photo/Emrah Gurel))

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Festive Atmosphere: In many Muslim countries, Ramadan is a festive time of the year with lights and decorations adorning the streets and buildings. (AFP) expand-icon View Photos in a new improved layout
Published on Mar 17, 2023 10:09 AM IST

Festive Atmosphere: In many Muslim countries, Ramadan is a festive time of the year with lights and decorations adorning the streets and buildings. (AFP)

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Breaking the Fast: Muslims around the world break their fast at sunset with a meal called Iftar. In some places, like Egypt and other Arab countries, families gather to share this meal with friends and relatives. (AFP) expand-icon View Photos in a new improved layout
Published on Mar 17, 2023 10:09 AM IST

Breaking the Fast: Muslims around the world break their fast at sunset with a meal called Iftar. In some places, like Egypt and other Arab countries, families gather to share this meal with friends and relatives. (AFP)

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Tarawih Prayers: During Ramadan, Muslims perform additional prayers called Tarawih after the Isha prayer. These prayers are typically held in mosques or at home. (HT photos/Praful Gangurde) expand-icon View Photos in a new improved layout
Published on Mar 17, 2023 10:09 AM IST

Tarawih Prayers: During Ramadan, Muslims perform additional prayers called Tarawih after the Isha prayer. These prayers are typically held in mosques or at home. (HT photos/Praful Gangurde)

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Charitable Giving: Ramadan is also a time for charitable giving. Muslims are encouraged to give Zakat (charity) to those in need, especially during this month. (AFP) expand-icon View Photos in a new improved layout
Published on Mar 17, 2023 10:09 AM IST

Charitable Giving: Ramadan is also a time for charitable giving. Muslims are encouraged to give Zakat (charity) to those in need, especially during this month. (AFP)

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Community Service: Many Muslims also engage in community service during Ramadan by volunteering their time and resources to help the less fortunate. (AFP) expand-icon View Photos in a new improved layout
Published on Mar 17, 2023 10:09 AM IST

Community Service: Many Muslims also engage in community service during Ramadan by volunteering their time and resources to help the less fortunate. (AFP)

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Suhoor: Muslims wake up early before dawn to eat a meal called Suhoor, which is eaten before the start of the fast. Suhoor is typically a light meal that provides energy for the day ahead. (AFP) expand-icon View Photos in a new improved layout
Published on Mar 17, 2023 10:09 AM IST

Suhoor: Muslims wake up early before dawn to eat a meal called Suhoor, which is eaten before the start of the fast. Suhoor is typically a light meal that provides energy for the day ahead. (AFP)

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Family Gatherings: In some Muslim countries, like Morocco and Turkey, Ramadan is a time for family gatherings and feasting. Families come together to break their fast and celebrate the month with traditional meals. (AFP) expand-icon View Photos in a new improved layout
Published on Mar 17, 2023 10:09 AM IST

Family Gatherings: In some Muslim countries, like Morocco and Turkey, Ramadan is a time for family gatherings and feasting. Families come together to break their fast and celebrate the month with traditional meals. (AFP)

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Night Markets: In some countries, like Indonesia, night markets are set up during Ramadan where people can buy food and goods to break their fast and celebrate the month. (AFP) expand-icon View Photos in a new improved layout
Published on Mar 17, 2023 10:09 AM IST

Night Markets: In some countries, like Indonesia, night markets are set up during Ramadan where people can buy food and goods to break their fast and celebrate the month. (AFP)

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