Photos: Canada and northwestern US bake under a record-smashing heat wave

Published on Jun 28, 2021 04:12 PM IST
  • Swathes of the United States and Canada are under record-setting heat conditions, forcing schools and Covid-19 testing centers to close and the postponement of an Olympic athletics qualifying event, with forecasters warning of worse to come.
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Pablo Miranda cools off in the Salmon Springs Fountain on June 27 in Portland, Oregon. The village of Lytton in British Columbia broke the record for Canada's all-time high, with a temperature of 46.6 degrees Celsius, said Environment Canada. And in Eugene, Oregon, a temperature of 43.3 degrees Celsius forced organisers to postpone the final day of the US Olympic track and field trials, moving afternoon events to the evening.(Nathan Howard / Getty Images / AFP) View Photos in a new improved layout
Published on Jun 28, 2021 04:12 PM IST

Pablo Miranda cools off in the Salmon Springs Fountain on June 27 in Portland, Oregon. The village of Lytton in British Columbia broke the record for Canada's all-time high, with a temperature of 46.6 degrees Celsius, said Environment Canada. And in Eugene, Oregon, a temperature of 43.3 degrees Celsius forced organisers to postpone the final day of the US Olympic track and field trials, moving afternoon events to the evening.(Nathan Howard / Getty Images / AFP)

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Cliff divers line up along the Clackamas River at High Rocks Park at on June 27 in Portland, Oregon. Because of climate change, record-setting temperatures are becoming more frequent. Globally, the decade to 2019 was the hottest recorded, and the five hottest years have all occurred within the last five years, AFP reported.(Nathan Howard / Getty Images / AFP) View Photos in a new improved layout
Published on Jun 28, 2021 04:12 PM IST

Cliff divers line up along the Clackamas River at High Rocks Park at on June 27 in Portland, Oregon. Because of climate change, record-setting temperatures are becoming more frequent. Globally, the decade to 2019 was the hottest recorded, and the five hottest years have all occurred within the last five years, AFP reported.(Nathan Howard / Getty Images / AFP)

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Kids playing in the Salmon Springs Fountain in Portland, Oregon on June 27 when the city hit 44.4 degrees Celsius, according to the US National Weather Service (NWS), breaking the city's record set a day earlier.(Nathan Howard / Getty Images / AFP) View Photos in a new improved layout
Published on Jun 28, 2021 04:12 PM IST

Kids playing in the Salmon Springs Fountain in Portland, Oregon on June 27 when the city hit 44.4 degrees Celsius, according to the US National Weather Service (NWS), breaking the city's record set a day earlier.(Nathan Howard / Getty Images / AFP)

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An abandoned and melting pint of ice cream dries along a city street on June 27 in Portland, Oregon. The heat has been blamed on a high-pressure ridge trapping warm air in the region. The NWS previously said it would "likely be one of the most extreme and prolonged heat waves in the recorded history of the Inland Northwest."(Nathan Howard / Getty Images / AFP) View Photos in a new improved layout
Published on Jun 28, 2021 04:12 PM IST

An abandoned and melting pint of ice cream dries along a city street on June 27 in Portland, Oregon. The heat has been blamed on a high-pressure ridge trapping warm air in the region. The NWS previously said it would "likely be one of the most extreme and prolonged heat waves in the recorded history of the Inland Northwest."(Nathan Howard / Getty Images / AFP)

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Austun Wilde rests with her two dogs, Bird Is The Wurd and Fenrir at a cooling center in the Oregon Convention Center on June 27 in Portland, Oregon. The dangerously hot temperatures raise wildfire risk, may worsen air pollution, and pose public health threats in a region where many don’t have air conditioning, Bloomberg reported.(Nathan Howard / Getty Images / AFP) View Photos in a new improved layout
Published on Jun 28, 2021 04:12 PM IST

Austun Wilde rests with her two dogs, Bird Is The Wurd and Fenrir at a cooling center in the Oregon Convention Center on June 27 in Portland, Oregon. The dangerously hot temperatures raise wildfire risk, may worsen air pollution, and pose public health threats in a region where many don’t have air conditioning, Bloomberg reported.(Nathan Howard / Getty Images / AFP)

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People head to the beach to cool off during the scorching weather of a heatwave in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada on June 27. The warmth is building under a so-called heat dome that may have been exacerbated by climate change. It’s similar to the weather pattern earlier this month that led to a California heat wave, according to Jeff Masters, a meteorologist with Yale Climate Connections.(Jennifer Gauthier / REUTERS) View Photos in a new improved layout
Published on Jun 28, 2021 04:12 PM IST

People head to the beach to cool off during the scorching weather of a heatwave in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada on June 27. The warmth is building under a so-called heat dome that may have been exacerbated by climate change. It’s similar to the weather pattern earlier this month that led to a California heat wave, according to Jeff Masters, a meteorologist with Yale Climate Connections.(Jennifer Gauthier / REUTERS)

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A full recycling bin at Green Lake Park during a heatwave in Seattle, Washington on June 27. Kinks in the jet stream have pinned summer weather in place leading to prolonged heat waves and drought, as well as storminess and flooding, Masters told Bloomberg.(Chona Kasinger / Bloomberg) View Photos in a new improved layout
Published on Jun 28, 2021 04:12 PM IST

A full recycling bin at Green Lake Park during a heatwave in Seattle, Washington on June 27. Kinks in the jet stream have pinned summer weather in place leading to prolonged heat waves and drought, as well as storminess and flooding, Masters told Bloomberg.(Chona Kasinger / Bloomberg)

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A man cools off at a misting station during the scorching weather of a heatwave in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada on June 27. The current heat wave over the Northwest started with flooding rains across China on June 23, said Masters. That fed energy into the jet stream across the North Pacific, making it stronger than usual and setting off a chain reaction of weather patterns that led to the high pressure ridge building over western North America and driving temperatures up in the U.S. and Canada.(Jennifer Gauthier / REUTERS) View Photos in a new improved layout
Published on Jun 28, 2021 04:12 PM IST

A man cools off at a misting station during the scorching weather of a heatwave in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada on June 27. The current heat wave over the Northwest started with flooding rains across China on June 23, said Masters. That fed energy into the jet stream across the North Pacific, making it stronger than usual and setting off a chain reaction of weather patterns that led to the high pressure ridge building over western North America and driving temperatures up in the U.S. and Canada.(Jennifer Gauthier / REUTERS)

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