It began with defiance at Columbia. Now students nationwide are upping protests against the Gaza war - Hindustan Times
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It began with defiance at Columbia. Now students nationwide are upping protests against the Gaza war

AP |
Apr 24, 2024 02:05 AM IST

It began with defiance at Columbia. Now students nationwide are upping protests against the Gaza war

NEW YORK — What began last week when students at a New York Ivy League school refused to end their protest against Israel’s war with Hamas had turned into a much larger movement by Tuesday as students across the nation set up encampments, occupied buildings and ignored demands to leave.

It began with defiance at Columbia. Now students nationwide are upping protests against the Gaza war
It began with defiance at Columbia. Now students nationwide are upping protests against the Gaza war

Protests against the war had been bubbling for months but kicked into a higher gear after more than 100 pro-Palestinian demonstrators who had camped out on Columbia University's upper Manhattan campus were arrested Thursday. Dozens more protesters have been arrested at other campuses since, and many now face charges of trespassing or disorderly conduct.

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With tensions at Columbia continuing to run high and some students afraid to set foot on the campus, officials said the university will switch to hybrid learning for the rest of the semester. Like many universities, Columbia is counting down until the end of the semester, with its final day of classes scheduled for Monday and exams finishing by the end of next week.

At nearby New York University, police said 133 protesters were taken into custody late Monday and all had been released with summonses to appear in court on disorderly conduct charges. University spokesperson John Beckman said NYU was carrying on with classes Tuesday.

New York City Mayor Eric Adams said police officers were hit with bottles and other objects at some of this week’s protests. He blamed outside agitators for joining in with genuine protesters.

In Connecticut, police arrested 60 protesters — including 47 students — Monday at Yale University, after they refused to leave an encampment on Beinecke Plaza.

Yale President Peter Salovey said protesters had declined an offer to end the demonstration and meet with trustees. After several warnings, school officials determined “the situation was no longer safe,” so police cleared the encampment and made arrests.

In the Midwest, protesters set up more than 30 tents on the central part of the University of Michigan's Ann Arbor campus called the Diag. And nine anti-war protesters at the University of Minnesota were arrested Tuesday morning after police took down an encampment a couple of hours after it was set up in front of the library.

On the West Coast, California State Polytechnic University, Humboldt, announced that its campus will be closed through Wednesday after demonstrators occupied a building Monday night. Three protesters were arrested. Classes were to be conducted remotely, the school said on its website.

Since the war in Gaza began, colleges and universities have struggled to balance safety with free speech rights. Many long tolerated protests but are now doling out more heavy-handed discipline.

Harvard University in Massachusetts has tried to stay a step ahead of protests by locking most gates into its famed Harvard Yard and limiting access to those with school identification. The school has also posted signs that warn against setting up tents or tables on campus without permission.

Christian Deleon, a 30-year-old Ph.D. student in literature, said he understood why the Harvard administration may be trying to avoid protests but said there still has to be a place for students to express what they think.

“It’s obviously complicated,” he said. “My opinion is we should all be able to use these kinds of spaces to protest, to make our voices heard."

Ben Wizner, a lawyer with the American Civil Liberties Union, said college leaders faced extremely tough decisions because they had a responsibility to ensure people could express their views, even when others found them offensive.

“But they also need to protect students from targeted harassment, threats and intimidation," he said. “And sometimes that line can seem like a gray one.”

At the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 22-year-old physics senior Hannah Didehbani said protesters had been inspired by those at Columbia. She said students didn't want to be "doing science for genocide.”

“Right now there are several professors on campus who are getting direct research funding from Israel’s ministry of defense,” she said. “We’ve been calling for MIT to cut those research ties.”

At the University of California, Berkeley, an encampment grew to about 30 tents Tuesday. About 100 people listened to speakers talking about Gaza.

“We’re standing here today because we’re inspired by the students at Columbia, who we consider to be the heart of the student movement,” said Malak Afaneh, a law student and spokesperson for the encampment. “But more importantly, we’re standing in solidarity with our people in Palestine.”

Columbia University President Minouche Shafik said in a message to the school community Monday that she was “deeply saddened” by what was happening on the campus, where some Jewish students say the criticism of Israel has veered into antisemitism.

Robert Kraft, who owns the New England Patriots football team and funded the Kraft Center for Jewish Student Life across from Columbia’s campus, said he was suspending donations to the university.

“I am no longer confident that Columbia can protect its students and staff and I am not comfortable supporting the university until corrective action is taken,” he said in a statement.

Columbia University has a history of protest, most notably in 1968, when hundreds of students angry about racism and the Vietnam War occupied five campus buildings. After a week, a thousand police officers swept in and cleared them out, making 700 arrests. The Associated Press reported at the time that 100 students and 15 police officers were injured.

The latest round of campus protests began after Hamas’ deadly attack on southern Israel, when militants killed about 1,200 people, most of them civilians, and took roughly 250 hostages. During the ensuing war, Israel has killed more than 34,000 Palestinians in the Gaza Strip, according to the local health ministry, which doesn’t distinguish between combatants and noncombatants but says at least two-thirds of the dead are children and women.

Perry reported from Meredith, New Hampshire. Associated Press writers Will Weissert in Triangle, Virginia; Larry Lage in Ann Arbor, Michigan; Steve LeBlanc in Cambridge, Massachusetts; Dave Collins in Hartford, Connecticut; Jim Salter in O’Fallon, Missouri; Haven Daley in San Francisco; and John Antczak in Los Angeles contributed to this report.

This article was generated from an automated news agency feed without modifications to text.

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